Payoff

Last semester was a tough one for me. I’ve been doing lots of thinking and writing about it, but so far there’s nothing I’m willing to share. Still, when the new semester started Monday I was excited and nervous in a way I haven’t been for a while. I laid my clothes out the night before and still forgot my lunch in the flurry of leaving.

Moment one: I am teaching a grade 12 English class for the first time in a few years. I love teaching grade 12 and my mind is awash in possibilities, especially since I have completely revamped my reading and writing instruction since I last taught this level. Also, years of teaching students who benefit from explicit and concrete beginnings have changed my understanding of learning. I’ve got a whole new bag of tricks.

I get these senior students up on their feet and have them move about the room as they consider and acknowledge their own attitudes towards English, reading, writing, group work, presentations and more. They can see that they are not alone in their experiences and views. When I ask them how many books they read last semester, over half the class clusters into the corner for “exactly what was assigned.” I squint my eyes at them, start to laugh and ask how many are lying – because research tells me that a lot of them fake read those books. They are relaxed enough that several of them grin and move themselves over to zero. “No worries,” I tell them, “we’ll find you something.” Our class is off to a great start.

Then comes the moment that blows me away. I ask them to write about their interests. THEY ALL HAVE PENS OR PENCILS. Every. Single. One. They pull out paper and write. Just like that, like it’s no big deal. I don’t know how long it has been since I taught a class where everyone is actually ready to learn. When the bell rings and they leave, chatting and laughing, I am bubbling with excitement. What might we accomplish this semester if we all have pencils? The possibilities are endless.

Moment two: My grade 10s come into the classroom with significantly less enthusiasm. This class is half the size of the other, but reading and writing are a much bigger challenge for these students. They have all made it to class on time, though, and we celebrate our successes in here. We do the same activities as the grade 12 class, and things are pretty low-key until we get to that question about how many books students read last semester.

Here’s where I should mention that five of these students had me for grade 9 English last semester. They are trying to catch up to where the system says they are “supposed” to be, so they’re with me again. They know my ways, and when I ask students to move to a corner to show how many books they have read, my former/current students move proudly to the areas that are well beyond “exactly what was assigned.” I don’t say much – these kids don’t always want to stand out academically – but I watch their peers notice that these students have been reading.

Then, magic occurs. After a few book talks, I gesture towards my classroom library. It’s a complete jumble because I had to switch rooms this morning: books are everywhere and in no discernible order. “Go ahead and explore the books to find something that might be of interest to you. Take your time; have a look.” And my five, my students who know me, find books, sit down and start to read. Just like that.

As they settle in, their peers follow suit. Before I know it, I have 12 reluctant readers sitting with books and reading quietly on day one of the semester. As far as I can tell, only one is fake reading. I’m heading over to chat with him, using this time to get to know him, when an EA comes in and shakes his head with astonishment. I shrug back, my eyes wide. I didn’t ask them to read: enough of them had books that they were actually interested in that they just did it. Because independent reading matters. Because time matters. Because routine matters.

Now, all we have to do is this, 90ish more times. Semester 2, here we come!

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13 thoughts on “Payoff

  1. This does my heart good! I taught at a school with a lot of troubles. Then I moved to the Country Club school. It reminded me that I can be an excellent teacher! And that “excellent comes” in different shapes and sizes. Sometimes I think I need to leave my current school – another school with troubles – to find myself as a teacher again. But somehow I always end up staying. I love that your readers showed up and have remained readers – now the stars of the class! And I can’t even imagine the joy of everyone showing up on day one prepared to write (pencils and all!)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I know I do best when my teaching is mixed. I do love working with students who the system isn’t serving well, but – oh! – I also love the challenge of convincing high achievers that *learning* is as valuable as marks.

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  2. This is wonderful! You deserve to have a fantastic semester, and look at the payoff from the work you did w/ those five kids. Soon that one kid will be reading. Maybe a graphic novel. Maybe something nonfiction. Maybe manga. He will get there because of the instructional moves you’re making every day! Bravo!! 💯

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The excitement is tangible here, the lifting weight of a solitary struggle, and the glimpse of joy that comes from making a difference, and seeing it happen in front of you. Never doubt your impact even when you might not see it, and relish in seeing what happens when they go with you!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Pencils and voluntary independent reading? Definitely sounds like a positive start to your semester! I’m sorry that your last semester was tough. Life comes in waves and cycles, so hopefully you’re on to a better one. It would be great if our two worlds (personal and professional) could sync up once in a while.

    Liked by 1 person

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